Uncategorized

Read PDF Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative book. Happy reading Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative Pocket Guide.

School, work, social pressures, finances, and so many more things are also at play. Wedge seems to think parents are always in complete control of all these factors, that they can simply resolve to fix things and make it so. In one instance, a child is in distress because the family is about to lose their home, due to the prolonged financial downturn. The parents simply pluck themselves up by the bootstraps, ask for a little help from family, and all is well.

Needless to say, it can't always work out like this. Wedge clearly works with a very privileged client base the milieu of the sessions she describes is quite obviously California upper middle class to a T--I can just picture the white leather couch but not just that, she presents herself as a kind of Perry Mason of therapy.


  1. Suffer the Children | Psychology Today Canada;
  2. Change the program, Change your life!
  3. Every Single One (flap series Book 3).

She never loses one, if the examples in this book are taken to be representative, unless it's because her clients failed her. I can understand wanting to portray more successful cases than discouraging ones for the purposes of this book, but it starts to come across as a bit dishonest and too good to be true. It would have helped me understand her methods even better if she had described a few more situations where it was NOT the appropriate approach, where she had to try something different or refer people out entirely.

Wedge wants us to think family therapy is not just an alternative to labeling and rampant psychopharmacology, but THE alternative, and her tunnel vision begins to detract from her excellent points. While at the beginning of the book her enthusiasm merely made me slightly wary, by the end I felt her authorial voice was smug and arrogant. I imagined myself in the shoes of the parents she spoke to and found myself feeling rather manipulated she is open about her practice of deceiving and misleading clients "for their own good" and cowed.

Wedge's ideas are good, but she is inflexible about them, so convinced of their superiority it seems she will not countenance any other solution. This is what got us into the fix we are in, with psychopharmacologists instead of family therapists. I felt many of her insights were also generalized too broadly. Like I am sure that in some instances--perhaps many, perhaps even the majority of instances--her adage that aggression in a child is a "metaphor" for hostility between the parents may turn out to be true. She also is very rigid about other ideas, which seems counterproductive and judgmental.

A child--even a very young one--being allowed to share a bed with parents is always a sign of marital troubles and enmeshment to her. A troubled child is always worried about one of her parents and trying to "help" by distracting them or caring for them. Parents must not only never argue in front of their children, they must also never complain about work oh for crying out loud or their aches and pains, or even let on about their chronic and severe illnesses.

A mother crying in front of her 10 year old when mom's father died is "traumatizing" to the child, even. She prescribes a stifling regimen of forced cheer for parents that is disturbing in and of itself, and seems to me to indicate more about Wedge's interior life than what's actually good for children. Given the revoltingly stereotypical Californianness of that particular regime of repression and shame, it goes without saying that Wedge barely nods at diversity in families.

Her clientele is clearly all relatively well-off, mostly but not entirely white, straight and married or divorced. The one mother with a disability is treated so dismissively it's shocking. Her pain and limitations are nothing but a burden for her husband and her child, apparently, and Wedge is all too quick to place the blame with her usual inflexible admonishments to sweep it under the rug and act as though all is well. Wedge shows a likely unconscious bias in favor of the fathers and against the mothers when there is a marital dispute, expecting women to humor husbands who sound like absolute tyrants in a couple of the stories--one of whom sounds like he may have actually been abusive.

That's dismissed upsetting to the child! Of course there's barely a nod at the end towards families who might not even be able to afford the luxury of private therapy but who instead are fed into the Department of Human Services, the less well-funded schools, and the criminal justice system. Considering foster children are THE main demographic for overmedication with psychiatric drugs, this is more than just a slight oversight.

Finally, Wedge makes a lot of claims but offers little proof beyond the anecdotal. I would like to believe that family interventions are an effective alternative for children with mental health symptoms. But other than Wedge's own testimonials to her personal track record, there's not much here to assure us it is actually working as well as she claims.

Having somewhat of a scientific bent myself, I'd want to see if it's her specific methods that make a difference if, in fact, there is a difference being made or the extra time and attention, or simply the passage of time and with it coming maturity and the natural extinction of some problems. There are few citations and not a whole lot to go on as far as backing up her extraordinary claims. All told, a promising hypothesis, one which I hope a less biased author will work to test and explore more thoroughly.

She is not qualified to speak about ADHD. This woman's work is selfish, ignorant and harmful to those suffering from ADHD. I have ADHD, as do both of my children my mom, uncle, grandfather likely did too. I was undiagnosed for most of my life and I am 45 now. ADHD is really caused from underdeveloped frontal lobe, leading to executive function disability.


  1. Things I Learned From Knitting: ...whether I wanted to or not?
  2. Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative?
  3. Business Succession and Estate Planning for the Closely Held Business: What You Need to Know (Quick Prep)?
  4. Sexy! Amateur! Nudes! - Singles 9?
  5. Tales from the Boiler Room.

We can't feel the passing of time, our emotions overreact easily, we can't focus or shut out external stimulus and its difficult to hold information in our working memory. We also need to externalize information in order to imprint it to our long term memory, causing ADHDers to repeat comments and stories through vocalization to aid in learning information.

Motivation and focus is very difficult too, due to our dopamine uptake failing to work properly. These processes are internal and automatic in a nuero-typical brain. In a ADHD brain they are compromised on a varying spectrum. The more severe your ADHD, the more severe the symptoms. These are not from bad behavior or intent. ADHD usually has a comordibity assoicated with it.

All of these disorders are connected to frontal lobe developmental issues or injuries. Any rate, this attitude that ADHD is not real or doesn't need medication is nothing but flat out lies. Medication and coping tools that helped me understand how my brain works are what is putting everything back together. This woman is spreading harmful misinformation and she does not know what she is talking about. The cover was sticky where someone must have taken the label off. I had to work to get it off. See all 17 reviews. Most recent customer reviews. Published on June 3, Return to Book Page. Preview — Suffer the Children by Marilyn Wedge.

With more than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice. But, disturbingly, a great number of children experience dangerous emotional and physical side effects from psychotropic medications.

Taking Control

Where can parents who are eager to avoid shaming labels and d With more than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice. Where can parents who are eager to avoid shaming labels and drugs turn when their child exhibits disturbing behavior? Suffer the Children presents a much-needed alternative: A family therapist for over twenty years, Marilyn Wedge shares the stories of her patients. Wedge presents creative strategies that flow from viewing children's symptoms not as biologically determined "disorders" but as responses to relationships in their lives that can be altered with the help of a therapist.

Instructive, illuminating, and uplifting, Suffer the Children radically reframes how we as parents, as health professionals, and as a society can respond to problems of childhood in a considerate and respectful fashion. Hardcover , pages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Suffer the Children , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Feb 04, Katie rated it it was ok.

It's hard to assign a star rating to this book. On the one hand, I think that Wedge's message about the perils of over-labeling and over-medicating young children is an important one, and I appreciate that rather than simply sounding the alarm she also provides ample discussion of a viable alternative--family therapy. And I do think that many of the strategies and insights she notes as a family therapist could prove to be useful alternatives to drugs and psychiatric labeling in situations like t It's hard to assign a star rating to this book.

The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative

And I do think that many of the strategies and insights she notes as a family therapist could prove to be useful alternatives to drugs and psychiatric labeling in situations like those she describes. It's well known even to undergraduate psychology students that often when a child is labeled as "disturbed" the individual is merely the "designated patient," whose distress both draws from and distracts from the larger issues at play. Wedge explores this phenomenon thoroughly, usually without blaming the parents overtly, and demonstrates some ways to "trick" the family into backing off of this ruinous strategy.

On the other hand, I was bothered by several things about Wedge's proposed solution, and how she presents it. She seems to believe that family therapy is the cure for every ill, and if it doesn't work, well, either the parents weren't doing it right or they just didn't stick with it long enough.

I'm not arguing that she shies away from medication too much. Rather, I believe she is somewhat blind to the bigger picture of a person's life.

Suffer the Children: The Case Against Labeling and Medicating

The family is huge, but it's not the only thing. School, work, social pressures, finances, and so many more things are also at play. Wedge seems to think parents are always in complete control of all these factors, that they can simply resolve to fix things and make it so. In one instance, a child is in distress because the family is about to lose their home, due to the prolonged financial downturn.

Suffer the Children: The Case Against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative

The parents simply pluck themselves up by the bootstraps, ask for a little help from family, and all is well. Needless to say, it can't always work out like this. Wedge clearly works with a very privileged client base the milieu of the sessions she describes is quite obviously California upper middle class to a T--I can just picture the white leather couch but not just that, she presents herself as a kind of Perry Mason of therapy. She never loses one, if the examples in this book are taken to be representative, unless it's because her clients failed her.

I can understand wanting to portray more successful cases than discouraging ones for the purposes of this book, but it starts to come across as a bit dishonest and too good to be true.

Suffer the Children

It would have helped me understand her methods even better if she had described a few more situations where it was NOT the appropriate approach, where she had to try something different or refer people out entirely. Wedge wants us to think family therapy is not just an alternative to labeling and rampant psychopharmacology, but THE alternative, and her tunnel vision begins to detract from her excellent points.

While at the beginning of the book her enthusiasm merely made me slightly wary, by the end I felt her authorial voice was smug and arrogant. I imagined myself in the shoes of the parents she spoke to and found myself feeling rather manipulated she is open about her practice of deceiving and misleading clients "for their own good" and cowed.

Wedge's ideas are good, but she is inflexible about them, so convinced of their superiority it seems she will not countenance any other solution. This is what got us into the fix we are in, with psychopharmacologists instead of family therapists.

Customers who bought this item also bought

I felt many of her insights were also generalized too broadly. Like I am sure that in some instances--perhaps many, perhaps even the majority of instances--her adage that aggression in a child is a "metaphor" for hostility between the parents may turn out to be true.

She also is very rigid about other ideas, which seems counterproductive and judgmental. A child--even a very young one--being allowed to share a bed with parents is always a sign of marital troubles and enmeshment to her. A troubled child is always worried about one of her parents and trying to "help" by distracting them or caring for them. Parents must not only never argue in front of their children, they must also never complain about work oh for crying out loud or their aches and pains, or even let on about their chronic and severe illnesses.

A mother crying in front of her 10 year old when mom's father died is "traumatizing" to the child, even. She prescribes a stifling regimen of forced cheer for parents that is disturbing in and of itself, and seems to me to indicate more about Wedge's interior life than what's actually good for children. Given the revolting stereotypical Californianness of that particular regime of repression and shame, it goes without saying that Wedge barely nods at diversity in families.

Her clientele is clearly all relatively well-off, mostly but not entirely white, straight and married or divorced. The one mother with a disability is treated so dismissively it's shocking. Her pain and limitations are nothing but a burden for her husband and her child, apparently, and Wedge is all too quick to place the blame with her usual inflexible admonishments to sweep it under the rug and act as though all is well. Wedge shows a likely unconscious bias in favor of the fathers and against the mothers when there is a marital dispute, expecting women to humor husbands who sound like absolute tyrants in a couple of the stories--one of whom sounds like he may have actually been abusive.

That's dismissed upsetting to the child! Of course there's barely a nod at the end towards families who might not even be able to afford the luxury of private therapy but who instead are fed into the Department of Human Services, the less well-funded schools, and the criminal justice system. Considering foster children are THE main demographic for overmedication with psychiatric drugs, this is more than just a slight oversight.

Finally, Wedge makes a lot of claims but offers little proof beyond the anecdotal. I would like to believe that family interventions are an effective alternative for children with mental health symptoms. But other than Wedge's own testimonials to her personal track record, there's not much here to assure us it is actually working as well as she claims. Having somewhat of a scientific bent myself, I'd want to see if it's her specific methods that make a difference if, in fact, there is a difference being made or the extra time and attention, or simply the passage of time and with it coming maturity and the natural extinction of some problems.

There are few citations and not a whole lot to go on as far as backing up her extraordinary claims. All told, a promising hypothesis, one which I hope a less biased author will work to test and explore more thoroughly. Oct 10, Jenn rated it liked it Shelves: I finished this book a few days ago, but I didn't want to write this review until I had mulled it over a few days. Ultimately, I do not believe that this book would be very helpful for parents, especially not the parents I typically work with so I will not be recommending it.

Like the author, I am often troubled by what seems to be a rapid labeling of children's behaviors. I also agree with the author that many children's problems have a genesis in their families of origin. For example, almost a I finished this book a few days ago, but I didn't want to write this review until I had mulled it over a few days.

For example, almost all of the children I work with are labeled ADHD, but I don't really believe they have the disorder. Of course any kid forcibly removed from his or her abusive family is going to be restless, distractable, hypervigilant, and anxious! With more than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice. But, disturbingly, a great number of children experience dangerous emotional and physical side effects from psychotropic medications.

Book Details

Where can parents who are eager to avoid shaming labels and drugs turn when their child exhibits disturbing behavior? Suffer the Children presents a much-needed alternative: A family therapist for over twenty years, Marilyn Wedge shares the stories of her patients. Wedge presents creative strategies that flow from viewing children's symptoms not as biologically determined "disorders" but as responses to relationships in their lives that can be altered with the help of a therapist.