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Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. The Summer of our Discontent. Sponsored products related to this item What's this? Sequel to Darkness Falls. If the lights go out forever, can love survive? The end is only the beginning. An Act Of Love. Hot actress Liberty and yoga studio owner Jessica get a second chance. Can love win out over fame and money in this steamy Hollywood lesbian romance? Life Pushes You Along. Follow bookshop assistant Zoe as she tries to pluck up the courage to approach her frequent customer and long-term crush Rebecca.

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The Secret of St. Claire

Love is never easy in McCall. However, when you find it you'll wonder how you almost missed your soul mate. Check out the Passport to Love Series. Give Me Some Sugar. When Angie hires consultant Ellen to help her bakery business, sparks fly in this steamy lesbian romp. Can a work relationship become something more? Product details File Size: Intaglio Publications April 30, Publication Date: April 30, Sold by: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Read reviews that mention alexander robin romance funny humor sweet laugh rose lindsay pleasant coming nicole mother town grew witty laughed ending drama dialogue. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This was a very heartfelt book. Full of smiles, tears, friendships and exciting revelations. Coming to terms with ones fears of hate and gossip. This story addresses homophobia, bullying, and what accusations can do to someone.

Robin Alexander does a wonderful job tackling each subject with tacked, laughter and kindness. This book although I wish the ending was longer it does end in a very sweet way.

Life Story of St Clare of Assisi...

You must go and get your copy today. You won't be disappointed. I will put this book in the "feel good" category. The story encompasses 4 people and their champion. Maybe that should be 3 people, a matchmaker and a champion. It can work both ways. To have Rose as your matchmaker, your friend and also be your mom. Yes, what a very good story this could be in a very small town for the gossip mill! There were just too many happenings that were funny, add a child, pets, family showing up at an inopportune time, shot gun toting old-timer, need I go on Oh, lets just add on an accepting family.

I laughed, cried and wanted punch a few people like one little tyke in here did, this was a good read. Lindsay lives in the quiet little town of St. Claire, LA with her 7 year old daughter, Alexis. Her mother, Rose, lives next door and works with her at the hardware store they own. With everyone knows everything about everyone else, Lindsay has kept a secret buried deep.

Nicole Allen, the new Vet, comes to town. Robin Alexander has written a fantastically sweet story, with witty dialogue and completely relatable characters. There's no angsty misunderstanding drama that usually constitutes half of the typical lesbian novel. Instead, The Secret of St Claire is a refreshing look of acceptance and love in today's society.

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Robin Alexander turns this story of every day people into a teachable moment. She styles it in such a witty and sometimes laugh out loud moments. Such a good read indeed. Standing on its own, "The Secret of St Claire" might have been a nice satisfying read. The writer has a very pleasant style that is easy to take in, the characters are appealing, and the storyline packs a whole lot of charm. On the down side, unfortunately the outline for this story seems a little too similar to others by this writer.

Though the main characters are very well fleshed out, the supporting cast is too familiar to feel entirely new. In addition, a lack of tension and a slightly flat resolution makes the story just a little one-dimensional. However, given all of that, Robin Alexander outwrites a lot of people in this genre even when she's not at her best, and I would still recommend it as a charming entertaining read.

Truly appreciate the people in this book. Silver was used for flatware in the belief that it could detect poisons. The derivation of orange; which came first, the color or the fruit? A long-forgotten name for New York City. A bit of science on how fluorescents work. Some words that we think of as colors began as something else. A reason why the blue light from televisions affects us in certain ways. And on and on and on, delightfully. There are words in here that were quite unfamiliar in this context.

Isabelline is a color? Minium must be a small color , Madder an angry one? Woad is a color? Well, if you say so. Best of all is Mummy. Suffice it to say that this was the most disturbing chapter of the book, one that kept coming back into my thoughts unbidden. Ironically, the pigment was a shade of brown that did not preserve itself all that well. Is it Baker-Miller pink, Mountbatten pink, puce, fuchsia, shocking, fluorescent, or maybe amaranth? Or if you are feeling blue, which shade?

Indigo, Prussian, Egyptian, woad, electric, or maybe cerulean? And when you are in a black mood, well, you get the idea. For the truly bleak there is Vantablack, a carbon nanotube technology created in Britain in , traps In person it is so dark it fools the eyes and brain, rendering people unable to perceive depth and texture. For any who enjoy learning new things, this book is the definition of a fun read, offering fascinating information in bite-sized, tasty nuggets of multi-colored brain candy for your synaptical munching pleasure.

View all 18 comments. Jun 10, Ilse rated it really liked it Shelves: However de gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum, in my experience colours, like the weather, can make an convenient topic to spark or rekindle conversation, having saved me a few times in socially awkward situations - as wherever we are, colour is everywhere.

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A Natural History of the Palette which, notwithstanding I learnt a lot from it on the origin of colours, entailed having to wade through numerous pages of rambling self-absorbed travelogue and However de gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum, in my experience colours, like the weather, can make an convenient topic to spark or rekindle conversation, having saved me a few times in socially awkward situations - as wherever we are, colour is everywhere. A Natural History of the Palette which, notwithstanding I learnt a lot from it on the origin of colours, entailed having to wade through numerous pages of rambling self-absorbed travelogue and left me hungry for more substantial information on the world of colours.

More than a history of colours, this is a compendium of stories, anecdotes and trivia on the 75 hues, tints, tones and shades that St Clair selected, ranging from lead white to pitch black, culled from excursions into history, religion, economics, sociology the use of Baker-Miller pink to assuage aggressiveness of prisoners , history of art, religion, politics Mountbatten pink, Dutch orange , biology, chemistry, literature Celadon.

She delivers clarifications on the etymology of the names of colours and jots in interesting colour-related linguistic musings. The book grew out of the monthly columns on colour she wrote for Elle Decoration , and judging from the footnotes, her bite-size entries rely heavily on two sources, Bright Earth: Giovanni Battista Salvi da Sassoferrato, The Virgin in Prayer — a tribute to ultramarine Quite some anecdotes I thought well-chosen, fascinating, amusing or surprising, like the one on mummy or Egyptian-brown — and the moment Edward Burne-Jones found out where that fine colour came from: Or this one, on heliotrope, which from one of the few colours Victorian women were allowed to wear during half-mourning, got a distinguished literary afterlife when the observance of mourning dress dictates waned: Cheveley, makes her entrance in heliotrope and diamonds, before swashbuckling her way through the remainder of the play and commandeering all the best lines.

Allusions to heliotrope also crop up in the works of J. Wodehouse, James Joyce and Joseph Conrad. The word is pleasure to say, filling the mouth like a rich, buttery sauce. Added to which, the colour itself is intriguing: It is not a book I could gobble up at once and which I found more enjoyable to dip into in between other books, or to read a few pages in to close the day with a moment of beauty. View all 42 comments. We take colour for granted these days; where ever you look you have garish clothing and brightly painted items competing for attention.

But it was never like that, go back several hundred years ago, and lost people wore grey or brown cloth that had been dyed with the ochres and earth colours. Those that had some colour in their lives were the rich; they could afford the purples and reds that adorned their clothes and the rare blues and yellows that graced their artworks. In this fascinating book, We take colour for granted these days; where ever you look you have garish clothing and brightly painted items competing for attention.

In this fascinating book, St Clair has uncovered the history behind 75 different colour shades and hues and tell their individual story. Modern colours are fairly robust, but it is a reminder just how lethal some colours were. Not only is it a nicely written and fascinating book, but it is a beautifully produced book too; each colour group is split into sections and the margins on each page are coloured to match the shade being written about.

As you read though each page changes subtly in colour and tone. Just rippling through the pages you transcend from white to yellow to the reds, blues greens and end up at the black, it is a nice effect. The dots on the front are embossed making touching the cover a tactile experience. It was worth reading and would make a good companion volume to Bright Earth: View all 5 comments. Mar 04, Jane LaFazio rated it it was amazing. I really enjoyed this book! It's a series of short, and fascinating, stories of about different colors. I loved the random trivia and interesting facts.

I think anyone, even with an interest in color, would love this book. A great gift idea! We chose this book for our January Amuse-Book because it's an absolutely wonderful read about the history behind some of our favorite hue's. It's a great conversation starter! You won't believe some of these stories, we can't wait for all of our babes and beaus to read! Jan 06, Hannah rated it really liked it Shelves: What a fascinating book! Why was blue formerly associated with girls and pink associated with boys? Why do What a fascinating book! Why do many Islamic countries have green in their flags?

I learned a lot from reading it and recommend it to art and history enthusiasts! A colourful read bound in a beautiful cover that would add colour to any coffee table. Our brains normally collect and apply cues about the ambient light and texture.


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We use these cues to adjust our perception, like applying a filter over a stage light. The poor quality and lack of visual clues like skin colour in the dress image meant that o A colourful read bound in a beautiful cover that would add colour to any coffee table. The poor quality and lack of visual clues like skin colour in the dress image meant that our brains had to guess at the quality of the ambient light.

Some intuited that the dress was being washed out by strong light and therefore their minds darkened the colours, others believed the dress to be in shadow, so their minds adjusted what they were seeing to brighten it and remove the shadowy blue cast. There are two different types of colour mixing: Because each paint pigment absorbs a different set of wavelengths of light, mix enough pigments together and they absorb every wavelength, becoming brown then black.

Mixtures generally become dull and murky compared to single pigments. Colours should be understood as subjective cultural creations: The Golden Gate Bridge had its colour chosen so as to blend in with the hills but pop against the sea and sky. The Dutch flag would have had orange in it, but no one could find a dye sufficiently colourfast, the orange strip either faded to yellow or deepened to red.

So by the s the Dutch gave up and began using red instead.

The Secret of St. Claire by Robin Alexander

Before the late s pink referred to a kind of pigment, consisting of a colourant e. Apparently the colour Baker-Miller pink aka drunk-tank pink could sap the strength of even the toughest man. Then Pre-revolutionary France , as in now, indulging in the latest fashion trends signaled status, wealth and a sense of tribal belonging in the jeweled echo chamber of the French royal court.


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Prussian blue was used by John Herschel in combination with photosensitive paper to make a proto-photocopy. Sepia photographs came about as squid ink was used to replace the silver in the silver-based prints with a more stable compound. Apr 22, Jamie rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a fascinating book for artists or anyone interested in history from an unusual perspective.

It is also so beautifully made that it is a joy to hold! A fascinating tour through the history of colour, with the manufacture and popularity of a rainbow of hues discussed in lively, short essays that engage and amaze. St Clair delves into the personalities, quirks and trivia associated with colours we take for granted in our everyday, colour-saturated lives, but which were once difficult to obtain and produce.

From ground up precious gems, to poisons, to bugs, the astonishing origins of these oft-times poetically names shades will delight the reade A fascinating tour through the history of colour, with the manufacture and popularity of a rainbow of hues discussed in lively, short essays that engage and amaze.

From ground up precious gems, to poisons, to bugs, the astonishing origins of these oft-times poetically names shades will delight the reader again and again. I found it useful to keep Google handy though, to look up images of artworks as they are mentioned. Additionally, the hardback edition of the book itself is beautifully produced with a tactile cover that was a joy to handle.

All in all, a bibliophile's delight. Writer Kassia St Clair gives a potted history of the colour palette, beginning with the surprising stories behind various shades of white. Read by Francesca Dymond Producer: Apr 22, Victor The Reader rated it it was amazing Shelves: Jun 02, Casey rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a great book to keep around and pick up from time to time. I was really fascinated to learn something about pigments as I knew basically nothing beforehand. You also pick up all these extemporaneous tidbits about history and culture along the way. Each color receives individual treatment and reads like essays so it's easy to read in small doses.

Het probleem is echter niet de kleur, of zelfs het woord, maar het etnocentrisme dat erachter steekt. Jul 30, Crystal rated it really liked it Shelves: The Secret Lives of Color is a fascinating book full of interesting facts, perfect for artists, history buffs, trivia buffs, and pretty much anyone else.

The book itself is lovely, true to its topic, with wide margins of the color in discussion on each page, and a fun multi colored hardcover design. The author has clearly researched well, in a book full of historical anecdotes carefully cited via footnotes to pages of sources in the back. There's a wide range of colors represented, of both natur The Secret Lives of Color is a fascinating book full of interesting facts, perfect for artists, history buffs, trivia buffs, and pretty much anyone else. Given the many small segments, this would be a good book to read in chunks when you might be interupted frequently or only have short periods of time to read, as each essay on a color stands independently, with only the occasional reference to another shade in the book.

But it can also be read in larger chunks of time, which allows one to see patterns emerging and start to recognize some recurring themes and facts in the world of color. I feel like I learned so much reading this book, about colors and the world that shaped and reflected them.

I'd definitely recommend this for a light non fiction read. Aug 20, Kate rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a delightful, interesting read. Book is divided into 7? Lots of great history, language and art tidbits in each of the mini-chapters. Clair draws on a wide variety of sources which she includes in a great notes and bibliography section.