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e-book Rice, Noodle, Fish: Deep Travels Through Japans Food Culture

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If you enjoy, or can get over, the initial correspondence, you'll probably enjoy this book; if not, then I'd avoid it. Dec 09, Josh Reisner rated it it was amazing.


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I think this is an amazing book. This is because it is very interesting, with a story, history, and background of each delicacy in the Japanese culture. I also realized that I learned a lot about the history of Japan, and how each city runs and operates.

Rice, Noodle, Fish Deep Travels Through Japan's Food Culture

This book identifies the history of Japanese food and culture, and how it is different from other cities around the world. My favorite parts of the story is when the book shows certain experiences only to be found in Japan, such as eating at lea I think this is an amazing book. My favorite parts of the story is when the book shows certain experiences only to be found in Japan, such as eating at least bowls of Ramen a year or having elaborate systems or things in general.

More specifically, I gave this book 5 stars because it did not have vocabulary that was too complex, making it perfectly easy to read. I also thought that everything that could have not been interesting was somehow made interesting with the writer's style and point of view. Lastly, the book was given 5 stars because it generally had no noticeable flaws or undesirables that would make it less appealing to read. Traveling to Japan Now I love Japanese food and in love finding out where things have come from and why they are considered the best for that region.

This book does just that and more! After reading this book, I now want to travel to Japan more than ever and experience all of the food mentioned in this book, and see all of the different regions that comes with finding the food. Matt Goulding does and excellent job of not only making your mouth water and your stomach grumble, but the way he descri Traveling to Japan Now I love Japanese food and in love finding out where things have come from and why they are considered the best for that region.

Matt Goulding does and excellent job of not only making your mouth water and your stomach grumble, but the way he describes the food, the region, even the history behind the food is fantastic! If you enjoy traveling, food, or just want to know more about that bento box, or package of ramen, then you need to read this book. Jul 25, Lee Ann rated it it was amazing. It's a book I wish I read before I went to Japan, and yet I still have a deep appreciation for it even though I've been to Japan a number of times.

This is food porn on the page, and Goulding takes you on an amazing journey. He even had me thinking I should try chicken sashimi or mackerel that's been fermented for 15 years. And these are decisions I usually make on the fly, while in Japan, with Like the title says, Matt Goulding's "Rice, Noodle Fish" is a deep travel through Japan's food culture.

And these are decisions I usually make on the fly, while in Japan, with sake-in-hand. The best part is, I finished the book, and I am inspired. Apr 10, Crystal rated it it was amazing. This book was amazing. I got it from the library and paid a huge fine because I couldn't bear to return it. So I'll have to buy it. I have a love affair with Japan, and the detail on each prefecture's food culture was fascinating. After each chapter, I HAD to have sushi, or ramen, or noodles.

Rice, Noodle, Fish : Deep Travels Through Japan's Food Culture

Mar 31, Sarah rated it it was amazing Shelves: I loved this book. If you like food, this might be a good book to read. I don't think you need to love Japan or Japanese food before you pick this up. Still, after reading it, I am confident that I must visit Japan and that this book will be my only guide.

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I mostly care about eating food in Japan right now. I travel to Japan for work relatively regularly. I had very little understanding of the food culture until I read this book. It'll shed a new light on meals and eating in Japan. Highly recommend for those who travel to Japan or those interested in food culture. Mar 11, Marianne Young rated it it was ok. Simply too pretentious throughout. Rhapsodizing over a chef whose passion is showcasing water? It's time to tell the emperor he has no clothes on. The two stars are for the interesting pictures.

Apr 01, Jenn rated it it was amazing Shelves: I read the first half before I went to Japan and the second half after and now I want to go back already! Oct 10, Jessica rated it really liked it. Excellent reference guide to refer to often if you are planning a trip to Japan. Jul 09, Bookworm rated it it was ok. Maybe my expectations were too high. I loved the idea of the book: When the book was being hyped it sounded like a fun read and I've read a few Japan food-specific books that seem similar to this, so it seemed like a good read.

So you'll look at foods you have probably heard of sushi, ramen but learn a bit more like what's stocked in their convenience stores, what are some common phrases to know, what are "love hotels", etc. Tha Maybe my expectations were too high. That said, the food is very much the focus here and the book won't serve as a general travel guide.

I just didn't care for it. I had hoped there would be more pictures instead of pictures mostly grouped together after many pages of text which is weirdly formatted with two separate columns. Sometimes the picture placement makes sense for comparison but it would have been a lot more visually appealing to have more pictures spread throughout.

Also didn't care for the pretentiousness which is perhaps maybe part of the reason why I was so hesitant to see Bourdain's name associated with it. Maybe a foodie or someone who is going to spend a significant time in Japan and could theoretically explore some of what the author writes about in a study abroad program or work transfer, etc. Otherwise I'd borrow from the library if you're really interested but I think you'd be safe skipping it. I am right in the target demographic for this book. I'm going to Japan in a little over a month and I at least like to get a flavor of the true cuisine of the places I visit, so I like to do my homework.

Goulding's book isn't going to necessarily help you line up your reservations to Japan's culinary heartland, but it will give you some extremely helpful context for deciding which things you'd like to do and which thing you HAVE to do. Okonomiyaki, for instance, was transformed from something that I am right in the target demographic for this book. Okonomiyaki, for instance, was transformed from something that a co-worker suggested in passing at a party to something that I'm thinking of altering my itinerary around so I can try both Hiroshima and Osaka style.

He has a deep appreciation for the shokunin of Japan -- chefs who demonstrate a single-minded devotion to their craft. And he imbues that appreciation in the region. He also gives helpful historic context about things that make up "traditional" Japanese food, including the story behind the American wheat that powers Japanese noodles. Goulding is a competent writer who, through focusing on the story behind the food, becomes a capable steward. I don't know that I was really blown away by his prose at any point. I think the reliance on the cryptic 'umami' description for most Japanese food became tiresome after a while.

But I've also watched enough food videos to know that the capacity to describe foods and flavors without sounding repetitive and dull is extremely hard. I do somewhat regret not getting the dead tree version of this book since the Kindle version was just as expensive and I definitely feel I missed out on the photography. Jan 08, Aziff rated it it was amazing Shelves: Rarely do I read a book that stirs up the strongest of emotions and motivations in me. I've been to Japan twice over the years and fell in love with its culture, mystique and more importantly, its food.

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Goudling brings that spirit into this ambitious project that delves into Japan's history and culture through the medium of food. Rice, Noodle, Rarely do I read a book that stirs up the strongest of emotions and motivations in me. Rice, Noodle, Fish divides its chapters up to a few different areas in the island nation and in each, covers the different culinary experiences and specialities that make the areas so distinctive. From the outside, our assumptions of Japan revolve only around sushi and ramen - misinformed and generalised.

This is what M. Goulding's project attempts to do: One might mistake this for a travel guide it isn't or a travelogue close but not. Fact is, Rice, Noodle, Fish sits on an entirely undefined travel category of its own. At times, while reading this book, I think of another Japan food-travel book that I've read, Sushi and Beyond: They both thread the same waters but with very different objectives and approaches. Goulding's writing is brilliantly clear, and his descriptions of the food: During chapters like kaiseki, ramen and donburi - I felt immediate urges to return to Japan.

To re-explore it with new lenses much like the one M. Through my journalistic career while freelancing for the Malaysian tourism online magazine , I discovered that one thread into cultures and history best through the stories of the people involved.

Rice, Noodle, Fish: Deep Travels Through Japan's Food Culture

It adds to the depth of its cultural history, as well as what the food really means to the nation as a whole. This is the beauty behind Rice, Noodle, Fish - where you really feel like you're an insider, knowing the life stories behind these culinary masters and in turn, developing a deeper appreciation for the meals they prepare because it means so much more to them than just a way to make a living. In the beginning of this book, Anthony Bourdain hopes that this book would inspire its readers to travel to Japan with a new set of perspectives, as well as to ditch or stretch that itinerary.

Well, consider me sold. It's one of my favourite chapters in the book, and should give you an idea of the tone of the whole project. Mar 15, Olliver rated it it was amazing. I received this in a giveaway some time ago and only just got around to reading it, but once I got started I was engaged the entire time. Goulding's writing style is equal parts informative and humorous without falling into the habit a lot of Western writers have of overly-exoticising the subjects.

There's a loving, humanizing touch to exploring the lives of the people who guide him through their culture. I loved the setup of splitting the regions into separate chapters and the various photo gui I received this in a giveaway some time ago and only just got around to reading it, but once I got started I was engaged the entire time. I loved the setup of splitting the regions into separate chapters and the various photo guides scattered throughout the book were an absolute treat.

If there's one complaint I have, it's that I would have liked a bit of attention paid to some of the Japanese foods that came about as a result of Western influence Christmas cake and KFC, crepe stands, spaghetti neapolitan just because they're an interesting bit of cultural fusion. But honestly, if you're into food writing, you'll adore this. Otherwise, it might be an acquired taste, but it's worth a try either way! Aug 15, Niki Ganong rated it it was amazing.

An excellent Japanese food guide book and a pleasure to read! Goulding takes you from convenience stores to ramen stalls to Kyoto's kaiseki spreads. My only regret is that I read it on Kindle paperwhite, and missed out on many of the gorgeous photographs that are in the print version.

I read this book with my phone in one hand so that I could bookmark all of the fantastic food and restaurants that he recommends. And I ate them and they were indeed excellent. From Lawsons' egg salad sandwiches th An excellent Japanese food guide book and a pleasure to read! From Lawsons' egg salad sandwiches the bread is so springy and the eggs are a creamy delight to bite-sizes plump, pork gyoza, to giant bowls of glasses-fogging ramen, I ate them all and enjoyed reading back stories about them. A small quibble is that, at times, the author apes Bourdain's bombastic voice.


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Looking for beautiful books? Visit our Beautiful Books page and find lovely books for kids, photography lovers and more. It needs this book. Anthony Bourdain An innovative new take on the travel guide, Rice, Noodle, Fish decodes Japan's extraordinary food culture through a mix of in-depth narrative and insider advice, along with color photographs.

In this five-thousand-mile journey through the noodle shops, tempura temples, and teahouses of Japan, Matt Goulding, co-creator of the enormously popular Eat This, Not That! You won't find hotel recommendations or bus schedules; you will find a brilliant narrative that interweaves immersive food journalism with intimate portraits of the cities and the people who shape Japan's food world.

This is not your typical travel guide. Rice, Noodle, Fish is a rare blend of inspiration and information, perfect for the intrepid journeyman and armchair traveler alike. Take, for example, this excerpt, describing the tempura course of a kaiseki meal he has in Kyoto:. A round of tempura comes next: While there are plenty such descriptions, Goulding does leave room for gentle irreverence, such as when he attempts to briefly describe, for those who have no patience for long-winded descriptions, what a shokunin is:.

In the Western world, where miso-braised short ribs share menu space with white truffle pizza and sea bass ceviche, restaurants cast massive nets to try to catch as many fish as possible, but in Japan, the secret to success is choosing one thing and doing it really fucking well. A ramen shop in full feast mode sounds like a car vacuum suctioned against your front seat. These are certainly not laugh-out-loud moments, but they are likely to elicit at least a chuckle, which is a lot more than some other food and travel writers can manage.

Rice, Noodle, Fish : Matt Goulding :

There are quite a few lovely portraits of the cooks and chefs whom Goulding speaks with throughout his journey. The photograph shows him grinning broadly, a cigarette dangling from one side of his mouth as he gives a thumbs-up to the camera, all while he sends an enormous jet of flame from a blowtorch onto some cubed meat resting on a grill in front of him. It is this focus on the human aspect that I appreciate the most about this Rice, Noodle, Fish: From the father-and-son pair who are trying to move kaiseki cuisine forward into the twenty-first century, to the Guatemalan transplant making a name for himself as one of the best okonomiyaki chefs in the country, to the mother-and-daughter team working to keep alive age-old preservation techniques: Rice, Noodle, Fish reminds the reader that where there is good food there are, inevitably, good people who do the best they can, in the best way they know how.

Overall, Rice, Noodle, Fish: The pictures that accompany the writing serve to enhance the experience of the book, not only because it shows the reader the food Goulding describes, but also the people who make that food. At the end of the book, it is almost guaranteed that the reader will dream of turning a corner in a sketchy part of Osaka or a country lane in Hokkaido, and finding, almost by serendipity, the delights that Goulding has described.

I can think of no better encouragement to get onto the next flight to Japan than that. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Skip to content I had my first piece of sashimi between the ages of seven and nine. In his response, Goulding acknowledges that he is entirely aware of his outsider status, and instead of attempting to rectify it, he will accept it wholeheartedly, and let the insiders do the talking: For example, in the chapter about Osaka, Goulding attempts to use the relationship of food and drink to the Japanese people as a key to understanding who they are — in this instance, the difference between the Japanese at work, and the Japanese after work: For example, in this excerpt he addresses the way the Japanese treat immigrants: