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The author extensively interviewed numerous established figures in the industry, such as Howard Lincoln , Nolan Bushnell , Shigeru Miyamoto misspelled as "Sigeru" in the book if one regards Hepburn romanization as definitive , Alexey Pajitnov , and others, including people who spoke anonymously.

When the Game Is Over, It All Goes Back in the Box – DVD

This level of access to major figures in Nintendo's history, which US Gamer described as "unprecedented", made Game Over "the definitive work" which was referenced by nearly all other subsequent books and articles about Nintendo's history. Since its initial publication, Game Over has been reprinted with many different subtitles. One example is Game Over: Nintendo's Battle to Dominate Videogames. How Nintendo Conquered the World , an edition published by Vintage Press in , [8] contains a new foreword written by author David Sheff pertaining to the controversy over video game content in the early s.

In , a revised edition of the book titled Game Over: Among error corrections, photographs and new chapters written by Andy Eddy were added.

When the Game Is Over, It All Goes Back in the Box

A Three hits in an inning scores one run. Each additional hit in the same inning scores one more run. On the first weekend of play, games will be three innings. On the second weekend of play, games will be four innings. The Over-The-Line Committee reserves the right to decrease the number of innings played to facilitate the completion of tournament play in a timely manner.

If the game is still tied after that inning, play additional inning. D If still tied on runs after two additional innings, the team with the most hits wins. If teams are tied with the same runs and hits after two additional innings, play additional innings until either team breaks the tie with runs or hits.

Runs take precedence in this situation. E If at the end of any inning a team has an 11 or more run lead, the game is over. A Winning team all three members will be the officials for the next game on the same court. We just don't have the time. But deep in our souls we know an easy mission is not what we were made for. It will not thrill us.

No one ever went to see a movie called Mission Not So Difficult. And our deepest hunger is spiritual. We hunger for meaning. We hunger for love. We hunger for redemption. Jun 26, Suzanne rated it it was amazing.


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Excellent work for Ortberg. This is the first one of his I've read and I was not disappointed.

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This is an evaluation of chasing money and promotions while sacrificing relationships in the process. This is an evaluation of a symptom of many a poor soul who cries out on his death bed after all is said and done. Relationships are sacrificed for career gain far too often in an empirical world. If you haven't experienced this in yourself or those you love or once loved, then you are a rarity. This is Excellent work for Ortberg. This is a common mourning of the human condition. It's a pretty common sickness of humankind, however, to justify walking away from family or friends in order to further a monetary raise or career.

Ortberg puts this in complete and despairing perspective as he shakes sense in the reader to understand the mind of God by reaching out to others and keeping selfish focus on one's own glory as a commodity that we can't take with us. Another thing I love about this book is the tendency for the tycoon minded to always keep score. To be one up on someone else, by winning a promotion over another, a raffle, score someone else's partner, or pursue winning favor of a step child or grandchild over another person is merely the reflection of a competitive nature that will never be tamed as long as we obsess over keeping score for our own personal glory.

Lewis paralleled a competitive nature in some people as synonymous with absolute vanity. In the same way, Ortberg gets precise and ruthless as he psychoanalyzes some human tenacity to keep score and "win" over another through competition and winning gain. He hits dead on with the realization that this kind of a quest to beat others "to the punch" or take over someone else's relationships, position, or worth, eventually lowers our quality of spirit and marks this triumph as a manifestation of self-indulging fools.

Compassion is walking in the line of God, not "beating" someone over. This work is insightful into the human condition. It speaks of these competitive natures among us as toxic in the internalization of "I am better than she is, and my score proves it. Getting closer to God means to stop keeping score; to live life in the divine and care deeply for others, above and beyond one's own foolish pride. It means to drop the hatchet that chops someone else down with one's own competitive ego points through gain.

This book is well written with jaw dropping metaphors that make so much clarity, it's an easy read out of a complicated psychology.

Mar 29, Jay Ehret rated it really liked it. Not every spiritual book needs to change your life. And while I know of someone who's life has been profoundly affected by this particular one, it did not have that effect on me, and that's okay. Sometimes books just need to nudge you forward on your path, sometimes they need to bring you back to the path, and sometimes just reaffirm what you feel in your heart.

For me it was getting me back on the path. Ortberg is a masterful storyteller and here he uses his stories to bring you face-to-face wi Not every spiritual book needs to change your life. Ortberg is a masterful storyteller and here he uses his stories to bring you face-to-face with your mortality and prompt you to think about what you should value most. I thought the chapter on preventing regret in your life was most thought provoking.

People tend to have a lot of regret when they understand the game is almost over. While it didn't necessarily resolve any issues, it brought the debate squarely to the front of my mind. So regret prevention means taking an honest look at what commitments are shaping our lives. If that's what you're looking for, there are plenty of questions in this book to help you do that, with lessons attached to help you answer. Feb 01, Shaun Lee rated it it was amazing.

I read it in a day, though not in a single sitting. As a bible school student, I gravitate toward more theologically "deep" and "scholarly" titles. I am so thankful to Ortberg for reminding me what on earth should I be doing with my life, even as I am embarking on a new journey in life that would kickoff the start of a career and involve financing A masterpiece.

I am so thankful to Ortberg for reminding me what on earth should I be doing with my life, even as I am embarking on a new journey in life that would kickoff the start of a career and involve financing the purchase of a new house. It is so easy to be caught up with the truly temporal things of this world, acquiring material goods and objects, even to give one's life in the pursuit of attain greater wealth, recognition, power, maybe even friends.

When the Game Is Over, It All Goes Back in the Box – DVD

I would not be able to do justice to John's brilliant narrative if I were to try and summarise the key points, but I do highly highly recommend you purchase it or borrow it from a library and let the Holy Speak to you through it! Ortberg skills as a master storyteller is evident in this book, with the many illustrative stories to keep the reader interested on his various theses.

I enjoyed the book so much that I promptly ordered 2 more to keep as would-be gifts when the occasion arises! Almost everything in this book I thoroughly agree with, the only thing that i would be hesitant to endorse would be that solomon was the author or the book of Ecclesiastes. Jan 28, Dottie Parish rated it really liked it Shelves: It All Goes Back in the Box by John Ortberg, pastor and best selling author, is a clever and wise book about the fact that life is short and often our priorities are flawed and driven by plans for worldly success.

Playing Monopoly with his grandmother taught Ortberg that when the game is over it all goes back in the box. This game metaphor for life continues throughout the book pointing out that the object in life is not to win houses, hotels, fame or fortune. In the chapter titled No One Else Can Take Your Turn, Ortberg describes his experience playing doubles tennis with his father in a match they wanted to win.

With a tied score, his first shot went outside the lines. It was all up to his second shot. There was no bench player who could take his place. There are no passes in life. Comparing life to a calendar he suggests we fill each day square with what matters most. Beware of Your Shadow Mission is also a significant chapter. This is an excellent book that should inspire many Christians to live more intentionally. Oct 13, Chad B rated it really liked it.

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It's Ortberg need I say more. Anyone who has read John Ortberg knows what I mean. For those of you who haven't His writing is very down to earth, humorous and insightful. In this book Ortberg looks at life from the perspective of the monopoly board. Reminding us that when the "Game" of life is over we can't take anything with us. We can accumulate great things in life, but the question is what really matters?

John Ortberg » When the Game Is Over, It All Goes Back in the Box – DVD

We It's Ortberg need I say more. We can all experience great temporal things, but it's the eternal ones that really count. Here is my favorite quote from the book. It is filled with squares and each square is another day. We live one square at a time As I get older the squares seem to get smaller. One day I will walk into a square that has no door. I recommend this book to anyone. No matter your belief system this book will challenge the way you live.

Sometimes I struggle with realizing my own mortality. As I get older I find it easier. More aches and pains I guess. It's good to have a reminder that our time on earth is limited. I hope we all make the best of it. Apr 18, Francis Gahren rated it it was amazing Shelves: Using games as a metaphor, Ortberg presents carefully considered tactics for succeeding in life from God's vantage point. Each chapter weaves the rules of gaming with the Christian journey: Christians will especially appreciate Ortberg's wise counsel on being the kind of player other people want to sit next to, as he exhorts readers to learn to lose with grace, win with grace and forgive with grace.

Perspective is key; after all, when the game is over, it all goes back in the box. Ortberg demonstrates some finesse in bringing together the extended game imagery with various real-life stories that are by turns comical and poignant. With excellent tools for personal and group study alike, this book's strategy offers a win-win solution.

Oct 03, Sam Oxby rated it it was ok. There were a couple of gems in this book, which reiterated basic principles of my walk with Jesus that I'd not put enough emphasis on, or which had slipped over the years. I now try and note at least one thing which I am grateful for per day, as a means of remembering that everything is God given and undeserved. And I'm also more aware of allowing myself to settle for second best, to focus on things which I have prioritised, rather than God's priorities for me, on a day to day, month to month bas There were a couple of gems in this book, which reiterated basic principles of my walk with Jesus that I'd not put enough emphasis on, or which had slipped over the years.

And I'm also more aware of allowing myself to settle for second best, to focus on things which I have prioritised, rather than God's priorities for me, on a day to day, month to month basis. So this has helped to sharpen me up. The general premise of the book is about being focused on the prize to come, and acknowledging that this life is temporary, and remembering to focus on the eternal things rather than those which pass away. I felt it was quite a repetitive book, pushing this message home, though it's written in a very easy to read manner, with lots of anecdotes and stories.

I had maybe anticipated something a little more in depth and maybe with more biblical application - but then I don't know where that expectation came from. A good book, but not one that I would read again. Dec 06, Phil Whittall rated it really liked it. Here are my reasons why: It was on a subject close to my heart at the moment, being rich towards God. It included down to earth teaching on the importance of not focusing on stuff and instead focusing on people.

It talked about loving God and loving people. Here are some great quotes from the book: What I have now — my home, my possessions, my lifestyle — is enough. I will seek another and better kind of wealth than terminal acquisition. John Ortberg takes the image of a game, such as Monopoloy.

He recounts anecdotes with his grandmother, who taught him a great deal about sportsmanship and games in general, and he relates it to daily life. The overall theme is to make live worth living, since it will eventually come to an end, just like a board game. The book is divided into sections - setup, hazards, how to play, and so on - with parts of games used as analogies for different aspects of living life. I don't suppose there was an John Ortberg takes the image of a game, such as Monopoloy.

I don't suppose there was anything in the book that I hadn't read before in other contexts, but I found an interesting and often thought-provoking read. Ortberg's style is clear and inspiring, and there are some unexpected humorous asides here and there. May 02, Albert rated it really liked it Shelves: After having read My One Word: As a part of that, I've been thinking about what the eternal perspective does to our concern for what is important and what is trivial.

This book, which I started reading around the time I picked the word, addresses that topic exactly.